My dog has what looks like a red cherry stuck in the corner of its eye

Cherry eyes in pets

Introduction to cherry eye

A cherry eye is a non-life-threatening condition that occurs in dogs, and less often in some cat breeds.  It is an extremely descriptive term, as one can see an oval, bright red swelling in the inside corner of an affected dog’s or cat’s eye, resembling a cherry. As a pet owner one can easily become quite alarmed by seeing this, but fortunately, it only causes slight irritation to the dog initially and you will have time to attend to it and take your animal to the vet before the condition gets out of hand. It is never a good idea to just leave it be. The condition tends to occur more commonly in younger dogs and cats, usually between the ages of 2 and 6 years.



My pet injured its eye!

Trauma to the eye- eyelids and cornea

Just like in people, the eye of a dog or cat is a delicate structure that can be affected by a huge number of different conditions. This article will cover trauma to the eyelids, third eyelid and cornea.

Anatomy of dogs and cats eyes

The eye of the dog and cat is very similar in structure to the human eye but there are one or two differences. Both a cat and dog’s eye is globoid (round) in shape. The part of the eye exposed to the outside is protected by the eyelids and eyelashes, just as in people. The cornea is the see-through part of the eye. It is a thin layer, allowing light to pass through the pupil and lens to the back of the eye.  The white of the eye is known as the sclera. The conjunctiva is the pink part of the eye that can be seen between the eyelids and the eyeball. Dogs and cats both have an extra membrane, known as the third eyelid or nictitating membrane.  This membrane can be seen in the inner angle of the eye and sometimes it can cover most of the eye, particularly following trauma.